Self disclosure and online dating

For more information on how to build, maintain, and repair relationships refer to John R. He authored a book titled “Psychological Narrative Analysis: A Professional Method to Detect Deception in Written and Oral Communications.” He also co-authored a book titled “Advanced Interviewing Techniques: Proven strategies for Law Enforcement, Military, and Security Personnel.” He has published numerous articles on a wide range of topics including the psychopathology of hate, ethics in law enforcement, and detecting deception. This study investigates self-presentation strategies among online dating participants, exploring how participants manage their online presentation of self in order to accomplish the goal of finding a romantic partner.

In 2003, at least 29 million Americans (two out of five singles) used an online dating service (Gershberg, 2004); in 2004, on average, there were 40 million unique visitors to online dating sites each month in the U. Ubiquitous access to the Internet, the diminished social stigma associated with online dating, and the affordable cost of Internet matchmaking services contribute to the increasingly common perception that online dating is a viable, efficient way to meet dating or long-term relationship partners (St. Mediated matchmaking is certainly not a new phenomenon: Newspaper personal advertisements have existed since the mid-19th century (Schaefer, 2003) and video dating was popular in the 1980s (Woll & Cosby, 1987; Woll & Young, 1989).Thirty-four individuals active on a large online dating site participated in telephone interviews about their online dating experiences and perceptions.Qualitative data analysis suggests that participants attended to small cues online, mediated the tension between impression management pressures and the desire to present an authentic sense of self through tactics such as creating a profile that reflected their “ideal self,” and attempted to establish the veracity of their identity claims.Disclosures should be made over a long period of time to ensure that the relationship slowly increases in intensity and closeness.A steady trickle of personal information increases the longevity of the relationship because each partner continually feels the closeness that comes with self-disclosures. People who make personal disclosures become vulnerable to the person to whom the disclosures are made.People feel a sense of closeness to others who reveal their vulnerabilities, innermost thoughts, and facts about themselves.The sense of closeness increases if the disclosures are emotional rather than factual.In contrast to a technologically deterministic perspective that focuses on the characteristics of the technologies themselves, or a socially deterministic approach that privileges user behavior, this article reflects a social shaping perspective.Social shaping of technology approaches (Dutton, 1996; Mac Kenzie & Wajcman, 1985; Woolgar, 1996) acknowledge the ways in which information and communication technologies (ICTs) both shape and are shaped by social practices.Although scholars working in a variety of academic disciplines have studied these earlier forms of mediated matchmaking (e.g., Ahuvia & Adelman, 1992; Lynn & Bolig, 1985; Woll, 1986; Woll & Cosby, 1987), current Internet dating services are substantively different from these incarnations due to their larger user base and more sophisticated self-presentation options.Contemporary theoretical perspectives allow us to advance our understanding of how the age-old process of mate-finding is transformed through online strategies and behaviors.

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  1. I like try new things too so come suprise me with your ideeas I have more pics on flikr or clips on youtube or if u have gmail (1to11 folders to pick fro... I am Irinna Moris and i came from Republica Moldova.