Statistics about dating violence

Yet there is not a great deal of research that uses a longitudinal perspective or that considers the dynamics of teen romantic relationships. Although most research tends to indicate that more severe forms of physical violence are disproportionately experienced by girls, this is not a universal finding (O'Leary, K. [note 6] Giordano, P., "Recent Research on Gender and Adolescent Relationships: Implications for Teen Dating Violence Research/ Prevention," presentation at the U. Departments of Health and Human Services and Justice Workshop on Teen Dating Violence: Developing a Research Agenda to Meet Practice Needs, Crystal City, Va., December 4, 2007.

As a result, practitioners and researchers in the field tend to apply an adult intimate partner violence framework when examining the problem of teen dating violence.

These numbers were reversed for the boys: 5 percent said they were the sole perpetrator; 27 percent the sole victim. Teens that have witnessed violence within their own family are 50% more likely to be involved in an abusive relationship themselves. Violent relationships in formative years can have serious ramifications by putting the victims at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behaviors and further domestic violence. Dating Violence and Sexually Transmitted Disease/HIV Testing and Diagnosis Among Adolescent Females. According to the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, approximately 10 percent of adolescents nationwide reported being the victim of physical violence at the hands of a romantic partner during the previous year.[1] The rate of psychological victimization is even higher: Between two and three in 10 reported being verbally or psychologically abused in the previous year, according to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.[2]As for perpetration rates, there are currently no nationwide estimates for who does the abusing, and state estimates vary significantly.Teens report an even higher occurrence of abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, tech, verbal or controlling abuse; the most common abusive behavior experience is controlling behavior (47%), physical/sexual (29%) and tech (24%). Threats of suicide or self-harm is the leading reason why a college student who is an abused partner stays in the relationship (24%).The next most common reasons are afraid of losing friends (20%) and dependent on abuser financially (12%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”.In a third study, teen couples were videotaped while performing a problem-solving task. Researchers later reviewed the tapes and identified acts of physical aggression that occurred between the boys and girls during the exercise. They found that 30 percent of all the participating couples demonstrated physical aggression by both partners. In 17 percent of the participating couples, only the girls perpetrated physical aggression, and in 4 percent, only the boys were perpetrators.[8] The findings suggest that boys are less likely to be physically aggressive with a girl when someone else can observe their behavior. Neumark-Sztainer, "Long-Term Impact of Adolescent Dating Violence on the Behavioral and Psychological Health of Male and Female Youth," 8 (2002): 1332-1363. Among those college students that experience an abusive relationship, 70% did not realize at the time they were in an abusive relationship, 60% said no one stepped in to try to help them and 42% kept the abuse private and didn’t tell others about it. Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.Dating abuse ranks dead last on a list of topics parents most commonly discuss with their teens: school/grades (95%), money (90%), the economy (83%), family finances (78%), dating relationships (72%), alcohol (71%), drugs (71%), sex (64%) and dating abuse (31%). 52% of college students know someone in an abusive relationship yet only 8% see it as a major campus problem and many don’t intervene for the following reasons: think it will make the matter worse (62%), feel it is not their business (60%), think it will hurt their relationship with the victim (60%), they know the abuser (56%), and afraid the abuser might make their life more difficult (56%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

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