Dating british postcards

1447, which allowed the words “Post Card” instead of the longer “Private Mailing Card” on the back of postcards.

Private printers were now also allowed to omit the line citing the 1898 Private Mailing Card Act.

These changes to the backs of postcards ushered in the Divided Back Period, which spans from 1907 until 1915.

The Divided Back Period is also known as the “Golden Age of Postcards,” due to the vast popularity of postcards during this time period.

The Universal Postal Congress also decreed that after March 1, 1907, government-produced cards in the United States could bear messages on the address side.

Congress passed an act on March 1, 1907, in compliance with the Union’s decree, allowing privately produced postcards to bear messages on the left half of the card’s back.

First restricted by size, color, and other regulations, postcard production blossomed in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

By law, the government postcards were the only postcards allowed to bear the term “Postal Card.” Private publishers were still allowed to print postcards, but they were more expensive to mail than the government-produced cards (2¢ instead of 1¢).

On May 19, 1898, Congress passed an act allowing private printing companies to produce postcards with the statement “Private Mailing Card, Authorized by Act of Congress of May 19, 1898.” Private mailing cards now cost the same amount of money to mail as government-produced postcards: 1¢.

On February 27, 1861, the US Congress passed an act that allowed privately printed cards, weighing one ounce or under, to be sent in the mail. Charlton (other places seen as Carlton) copyrighted the first postcard in America. Lipman began reissuing Charlton’s postcard under a new name: Lipman’s Postal Cards.

Congress passed legislation on June 8, 1872, that approved government production of postal cards.

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